An analysis of the poem the tuft of flowers by robert frost

An analysis of the poem the tuft of flowers by robert frost

Then, he sees a butterfly, which leads his eyes to a tuft of flowers that the mower left standing. He looks in vain for the mysterious mower who has disappeared and has presumably moved on to another meadow. Now pick up your rakes and your shovels and head on out to the field.

However in the depiction of the butterfly and the description of the flowers, it takes an elevated turn. The medium, however, is labor. The tuft of flowers serves as a sort of catalyst for reconciliation with mankind.

Grass by robert frost

He feels lonely. Then, he sees a butterfly, which leads his eyes to a tuft of flowers that the mower left standing. This seems to be a direct reference to Pentecost in the Book of Acts, when the Holy Spirit comes to the disciples, as they are gathered in a room, bereft and confused after Jesus has risen from the dead and ascended to heaven. The speaker thinks of "questions that have no reply" 19 , probably along the lines of "Why is life so hard for me and this butterfly, out here on our own? The language up to this point has been simple and straightforward, with a directness for which Frost was famed. This prompts the reader to wonder why it should be thus bewildered; as though the butterfly also shares a sense of awe in the beauty of nature or the importance of the message which it has been sent to convey. Someone—we're not told who—has used a scythe to cut down a whole field of grass in the early morning. He was sometimes the object of scorn, both by the snobbish poetry elite of the time, and also by the farming community, as he tried to straddle both worlds. And once I marked his flight go round and round, 15 As where some flower lay withering on the ground. Indeed, the poem ends with a wonderful epiphany which suggests that he is leaning more towards socialism! Sadly for the butterfly, though, that flower's been cut down. It banishes his loneliness. Check out " In a Nutshell " for more. I thought of questions that have no reply, And would have turned to toss the grass to dry; 20 But he turned first, and led my eye to look At a tall tuft of flowers beside a brook, A leaping tongue of bloom the scythe had spared Beside a reedy brook the scythe had bared. Frost uses the mower in this poem to represent the artist, the poet, the painter, the creator of beautiful thought-provoking things.

All rhymes are masculine; the majority of lines are end- stopped. The immediacy of its appearance is made clear in the sixth couplet: But as I said it, swift there passed me by On noiseless wing a bewildered butterfly.

the tuft of flowers theme

Someone—we're not told who—has used a scythe to cut down a whole field of grass in the early morning. Nope, the mower left them there in an act of "sheer morning gladness" The mower in the dew had loved them thus, 25 By leaving them to flourish, not for us, Nor yet to draw one though of ours to him, But from sheer morning gladness at the brim.

Robert frost poems about work

It seems to be one of camaraderie, a refutation of essential loneliness. This statement is definitely true of this beautiful lyric which was written in After having felt a sense of disconnect with his co-worker, he comes full circle and his heart is filled with joy. Cheery thought, right? And once I marked his flight go round and round, As where some flower lay withering on the ground. The dew was gone that made his blade so keen Before I came to view the leveled scene. Two additional end-words, alone and ground, are repeated. The discovery has a deep effect on the speaker.

I left my place to know them by their name, Finding them butterfly weed when I came. Frost uses the mower in this poem to represent the artist, the poet, the painter, the creator of beautiful thought-provoking things.

This prompts the reader to wonder why it should be thus bewildered; as though the butterfly also shares a sense of awe in the beauty of nature or the importance of the message which it has been sent to convey.

robert frost couplet

The Speaker sees no sign of him, despite trying to seek him out.

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SparkNotes: Frost’s Early Poems: “The Tuft of Flowers”